Saturday, January 19, 2019

CAN TED CRUZ SAVE THE SPACE PROGRAM?

Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz finds himself in an interesting position in the new Congress.

He has been a champion of NASA and commercial space since he first entered the Senate six years ago. The last midterms, however, saw the exit of a number of space enthusiasts from Congress. Democrat and Republican Reps. Lamar Smith, John Culberson, Dana Rohrabacher and Sen. Bill Nelson have retired or been retired to private life.

Cruz virtually stands alone as a supporter of NASA’s mission and of the commercial space sector’s growth.

Will 2019 be the year of the turbine? Wind energy continues to surge in Texas
Childhood's End: A Novel
Dark Hunt (The Vampire Gabriella Book 2)
US army eyes $373 million purchase of Israel’s Iron Dome missile defense system
DARPA Builds Advanced Interceptor Weapon to Destroy Hypersonic Missile Attacks
Let’s keep the Green New Deal grounded in science
NASA’s Juno spacecraft captures Jupiter's massive storms, revealing planet's 'striking blemish'

Friday, January 18, 2019

NASA preps for 'Armageddon' style asteroid threat — but with far less drama

Neil deGrasse Tyson once tweeted that, “Asteroids are nature’s way of asking, ‘How’s that space program coming along?’” Dr. Tyson was making a sly reference to an incident 65 million years ago, when a huge rock struck the Earth in the region of the Yucatan and wiped out the dinosaurs and much else.

The dinosaurs did not have a space program. However, human beings, who arose to dominate the Earth after the dinosaurs’ demise, do have one and therefore the ability to save themselves if another world-killing asteroid approaches.

The Man from Mars: The Asteroid Mining Caper
The longstanding NASA-Russian partnership in space may be unraveling
Our Irrational Fear of Sexbots
The Anthropocene Is Coming to Mars
Three Hearts and Three Lions
The Moon, Mars, and Beyond
NASA educates Captain Kirk on weird blue light in Mars InSight photo
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is back in action after hardware problem
NASA's Cassini Data Show Saturn's Rings Relatively New

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Green New Deal will only happen if we go back to the moon
Iran satellite fails to reach orbit in US-criticized launch
China has started growing COTTON on the far side of the moon (and potatoes are next!): Pioneering mission to the lunar surface is successfully growing biological material for the first time EVER
I’M A SENIOR TRUMP OFFICIAL, AND I HOPE A LONG SHUTDOWN SMOKES OUT THE RESISTANCE
Apollo to the Moon: A History in 50 Objects
The Man from Mars: The Asteroid Mining Caper
'Please let us go back to work': NASA employees plan to rally at Johnson Space Center
NASA view of Jupiter looks like an infamous South Park character
China exchanged data with NASA for its historic Moon landing

Friday, January 11, 2019

SPACEX’S PROPOSED REUSABLE SPACESHIP, STARHOPPER, IS A WORK OF ART

SpaceX’s Elon Musk is as much a showman — and, to a certain extent, an artist — as he is a corporate CEO and engineering innovator.

When Musk launched his Falcon Heavy last year, he sent his used Tesla Roadster with a mannequin in the driver’s seat dubbed “Starman” into space. The image of the sports car with the Starman passenger flying into interplanetary space with the earth in the background was the most iconic of 2018, if not of the 21st century.

Green New Deal will only happen if we go back to the moon

You have to hand it to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio–Cortez (D-N.Y.). For someone who was, just a year ago, a bartender, she has some ambitious plans now that she is a member of Congress.

Among Ocasio–Cortez’s projects is something called the Green New Deal. The plan would mandate that the United States transform its energy infrastructure from one based on fossil fuels to one based on renewable energy, such as wind and solar power. Thus, the problem of climate change will have been solved and the Earth would be saved. Big-pocketed people like Tom Steyer, an environmentalist billionaire donor, view the idea with favor.

Our Future in Space Will Echo Our Future on Earth
Fake news journal paper revealed as fake news
Atmospheric Mystery on Saturn's Largest Moon
Life might exist on the new planet discovered around Barnard's star
Why is it So Hard to Go Back to the Moon?
The Case for Space: How the Revolution in Spaceflight Opens Up a Future of Limitless Possibility
Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Triggered A Mile-High Tsunami Across The Globe
Democrats’ Cynical ‘No’ On Immigration
Space Telescopes of the Future: NASA Has 4 Ideas for Great Observatory to Fly in 2030s

Saturday, January 05, 2019

THE RACE BACK TO THE MOON HAS BEGUN — AND CHINA IS IN FRONT

Meanwhile Rand Simberg leaps the length of his chain and lies about my position on commercial space.

Meanwhile, Mark Whittington continues to fear the yellow menace:

"The landing is a remarkable achievement. It illustrates Beijing’s burning ambition to become the supreme superpower on Earth, in part by conquering space. India and a private group in Israel are planning their own moon landings early in 2019. NASA is due to sponsor commercial lunar landings as part of President Trump’s return to the moon initiative in the next year or so.

"The prize of the new space race is the moon’s natural resources and control of the high frontier for all practical purposes."

The moon is a big place. No one nation is going to dominate it. And it’s a long way from a robotic lander, regardless of which side it lands on, to a lunar base. Mark continues to operate under the delusion that we can (or should) do Apollo again. Lunar resources will be developed privately, if at all. It certainly won’t happen by a government that has elections every two years.

I am fully on board with commercial partnerships regarding the moon and have extensively written to that effect for many years. He should also note my current piece in the Washington Examiner where I critique both the Gateway and the SLS. I championed Zubrin’s Moon Direct idea.

Regarding the Chinese I can only note that they don’t play well with others on Earth so cannot be expected to play well with others on the moon. The moon may be a big place but the poles are the important parts. The country that controls them controls access to the solar system.

NASA wants to go back to the moon the hard way
NASA’s New Horizons sends science back from the far edge of the solar system
Power From Commercial Perovskite Solar Cells Is Coming Soon
Dark Crusade: A Vampire Gabriella Story (The Vampire Gabriella Book 5)
Shoot for the Moon: Its Surface Contains a Pot of Gold
Many People Who Claim to Have a Food Allergy Actually Don't
The Five Ways The Universe Might End

Friday, January 04, 2019

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez dances in unearthed college video





I found this quite charming, but a little sad as well. She must have been pretty happy and fun to be with before she became an angry socialist.
THE RACE BACK TO THE MOON HAS BEGUN — AND CHINA IS IN FRONT

After a flurry of mysteriously appearing and disappearing tweets announcing the event, China, at last, confirmed that it has successfully landed the Chang’e 4 in the Van Karman Crater located at the South Pole on the far side of the moon.

The landing is a remarkable achievement. It illustrates Beijing’s burning ambition to become the supreme superpower on Earth, in part by conquering space. India and a private group in Israel are planning their own moon landings early in 2019. NASA is due to sponsor commercial lunar landings as part of President Trump’s return to the moon initiative in the next year or so.

NASA wants to go back to the moon the hard way

Fifty-six years ago, President John F. Kennedy went to Rice University in Houston and proclaimed, “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

Fast forward to 2018, and it seems that NASA is taking that line too much to heart. The space agency wants to return to the moon the hard way, and the plan does not sit well with a number of outside experts.

Reaching for the Moon: The Autobiography of NASA Mathematician Katherine Johnson
The Man from Mars: The Asteroid Mining Caper
How kugelblitz black holes could power future spacecraft
Why the Far Side of the Moon Matters So Much
NASA’s first planetary defense mission will send a spacecraft crashing into an asteroid
NASA’s New Horizons sends science back from the far edge of the solar system

The new year began with a mighty space triumph from a probe that three years ago had already made history. NASA’sNew Horizons planetary probe, which in July 2015 revealed Pluto to be a strange and vibrant world, flew by a Kuiper Belt object called Ultima Thule, over 4 billion miles away. Ultima Thule is the farthest object to have ever been encountered by a probe launched from the planet Earth.